Truth About "Starter Birds"


Here at Sugarcreek Bird Farm, we don't believe in "starter" or beginner parrots. We often get asked what a good bird to start with is when first delving into the world of parrots, and the truth is, there is no easy answer. Each species has their own individual pros and cons that may make one a better fit for you. Before committing to a parrot, we always recommend you research the species heavily and get first-hand experience with that type of bird to make sure they're a good fit for you. We often hear the advice for beginners who want a larger bird to start with a small one first (whether it be a budgie, cockatiel, conure, or bourke parakeet), and once they feel comfortable and more confident, they can "upgrade" for a bigger one. While in theory, there is nothing wrong with this practice; however, oftentimes the "starter" bird is rehomed or neglected in deference to the bigger, more exciting parrot. The little birds have become known as the ones you can mess up and make mistakes with; then, when you know what you're doing, you can get a "real" parrot. Using this "beginner bird" philosophy, the little birds are adopted with the sole purpose of being replaced by the bird you actually want to end up with. The little parrots have acquired the stereotype of being disposable and easy to take care of, neither of which is true. There is no such thing as an "easy" parrot. Birds are messy, loud, and high maintenance. If you want an easy pet, a parrot is not for you. From the smallest budgie or lovebird, up to the biggest macaw and cockatoo, each bird is precious and deserves a home that understands that. Even the little guys are a lifetime commitment. Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying that we recommend everyone without experience to go out and adopt a macaw or a Moluccan cockatoo, just because they're big and exciting. If there is a type of bird you are interested in, research, volunteer, and experience these birds for yourself, and make sure you truly are ready and committed to a lifetime with this type of bird. If you don't know where to start, we have over 30 long-term store pets at our store that are not for sale, but are here for people to interact with and get a feel for the species. We are always happy to help you hold and interact with them, answer questions, and give you an honest opinion of what kind we think would be a good fit for you. -Mary

Here at Sugarcreek Bird Farm, we don't believe in "starter" or beginner parrots. We often get asked what a good bird to start with is when first delving into the world of parrots, and the truth is, there is no easy answer. Each species has their own individual pros and cons that may make one a better fit for you. Before committing to a parrot, we always recommend you research the species heavily and get first-hand experience with that type of bird to make sure they're a good fit for you. We often hear the advice for beginners who want a larger bird to start with a small one first (whether it be a budgie, cockatiel, conure, or bourke parakeet), and once they feel comfortable and more confident, they can "upgrade" for a bigger one. While in theory, there is nothing wrong with this practice; however, oftentimes the "starter" bird is rehomed or neglected in deference to the bigger, more exciting parrot. The little birds have become known as the ones you can mess up and make mistakes with; then, when you know what you're doing, you can get a "real" parrot. Using this "beginner bird" philosophy, the little birds are adopted with the sole purpose of being replaced by the bird you actually want to end up with. The little parrots have acquired the stereotype of being disposable and easy to take care of, neither of which is true. There is no such thing as an "easy" parrot. Birds are messy, loud, and high maintenance. If you want an easy pet, a parrot is not for you. From the smallest budgie or lovebird, up to the biggest macaw and cockatoo, each bird is precious and deserves a home that understands that. Even the little guys are a lifetime commitment. Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying that we recommend everyone without experience to go out and adopt a macaw or a Moluccan cockatoo, just because they're big and exciting. If there is a type of bird you are interested in, research, volunteer, and experience these birds for yourself, and make sure you truly are ready and committed to a lifetime with this type of bird. If you don't know where to start, we have over 30 long-term store pets at our store that are not for sale, but are here for people to interact with and get a feel for the species. We are always happy to help you hold and interact with them, answer questions, and give you an honest opinion of what kind we think would be a good fit for you.

15 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All